Found at: http://www.kinodv.org/article/print/11/-1/7/


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We have set up a PayPal account. If you like the Kino or dvgrab software, consider donating to the Kino Developer Team. This article explains our Donation Policy.

Last Revised 2003-01-16 by Dan Dennedy < dan@dennedy.org>

The Kino developers appreciate any contribution you can make to help fund the development of the application. After two years of continual development with very little downtime, the developers are personally committed to bringing a fully featured and robust DV non-linear video editor to the GNU/Linux Free Software market.

Each general donation is evenly divided among the core team of Active Committers plus one equal share to donate to a worthy Contributor. However, an Active Committer may waive their share of the donation, which adjusts the percentage of the other shares equally.

A Contributor is anyone who submits a substantial code enhancement, documentation, or comprehensive quality assurance reports. An Active Committer is a Contributor who not only has commit access to CVS, but has shown a committment to the project by making some contribution to the last three releases. An Active Committer may lose their status when they have not contributed to two consecutive releases; however, they do not necessarily immediately lose their CVS commit access.

Contributors appear in the AUTHORS file that accompanies the Kino source code. Active Committers will appear in the README, online help, and About dialog of the Kino application.

Anyone, not just Kino Active Committers, may nominate a Contributor to receive a donation as a reward, but the Active Committers vote by simple majority to agree with the nomimation and to determine how much of a donation the Contributor receives based upon past donations.

A developer can also use the PayPal accounts as a simple mechanism to receive personal donations, but the Active Committers must be notified prior to receiving the donation to prevent false claims. This may happen, for example, because a user requests a specific feature they need and a developer promises to implement it in an exchange.




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